The Boulevard Montmartre At Night by Camille Pissarro

The Boulevard Montmartre At Night by Camille Pissarro

The Boulevard Montmartre At Night by Camille Pissarro is another fantastic example of Impressionism and can be found on the Chantry Buildings on Corporation Street. This painting is the only night scene from this series, and is a masterful rendition of the play of lights on dark and wet streets. Pissarro neither signed nor exhibited it during his lifetime although it is thought to be dated around 1897. Towards the end of his life Pissarro increasingly turned to the representation of town scenes in Paris, Rouen, Dieppe, Le Havre and London, mainly painted from the windows of hotels and apartments. In February 1897 he took a room in Paris at the Hôtel de Russie on the corner of the Boulevard des Italiens and the Rue Drouot, and produced a series of paintings of the Boulevard Montmartre at different times of the day. Pissarro may have been influenced by the series of paintings on which Monet was engaged at this time, and by the earlier urban scenes of Manet. This Gallery Town piece finds itself on the Chantry Buildings and building that takes its name from the nearby Chantry Chapel-on-the bridge. A chantry chapel is a building on private land or a dedicated area within a parish church or cathedral, set aside or built especially for and dedicated to the performance of the chantry duties by the priest. Over the centuries chantries increased their wealth, often by attracting new donors, and chantry priests were in many cases able to enjoy great wealth. In some instances this led to corruption of the consecrated life expected of clerics. This evident corruption was one of the factors that led Henry VIII to order the Dissolution of the Monasteries in England. At that time, chantries were abolished and their assets were sold or granted to persons at the discretion of King Henry VIII and his son King Edward VI, via the Court of Augmentations. Many Tudor businessmen, such as Thomas Bell (1486-1566) of Gloucester, thus acquired chantries as financial investments producing income streams derived from rents, or sold the assets at a profit. The Chapel of Our Lady on Rotherham Bridge is one of a handful of surviving Bridge Chantries. Standing at the middle of the medieval bridge that served as the main road into the town until the beginning of the twentieth century it is an unusual neighbour to the Transport interchange in the town. The building date of 1483 is derived from the will of a local teacher, John Bokying, who left "3s 4d to the fabric of the chapel to be built on Rotherham Bridge."

Jun, 02, 2015

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