Beach Scene, Trouville by Eugene Boudin

Beach Scene, Trouville by Eugene Boudin

Beach Scene, Trouville by Eugene Boudin can be found on Morpeth Street next to Rotherham College leading up towards Percy Street. The original is housed in the National Gallery who details this about the piece "This painting is one of the two panels in the Collection that may have belonged to Monet (see also, 'Beach scene, Trouville', 1870-4). Characteristic of Boudin's approach is the delicate fragmentation of the handling, which invests the scene with a sense of atmospheric freshness. This work records a bright but cloudy day with a group of fashionably dressed visitors gathered around a flagpole on the sandy beach. Between the misty blue of the sky and the brown tones of the sand, an emphatic white dress is visible in the centre, with touches of bright red and blue among the figures to each side. The seated figures to the left suggest comparison with Monet's painting of 1870, 'The Beach at Trouville', which probably shows Boudin's wife to the right, seated beside Mme Monet." The National Gallery also says this about the artist "Boudin was born at Honfleur, the son of a ship's captain. The centre of his early activities was Le Havre where he opened a framing shop, visited by painters, including Jean-Francois Millet, who encouraged him to take up painting. Boudin visited Paris, where he studied at the Louvre. He also established contact with painters of the Barbizon School.Like Corot, Boudin was largely self-taught and he followed Corot's example in his preference for working directly from nature. The majority of his paintings are small landscapes of the harbours and beaches of the coast of northern France, informed by a sharp eye for social detail. In about 1856 Boudin met Claude-Oscar Monet and introduced him to outdoor painting. The two worked together in the later 1860s."

May, 31, 2015

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